Hiatus

Hi guys. I’m sorry to announce that I’m taking a hiatus from blogging about Law & Order: SVU for the next few months. Most of you know that reality-checking TV is my hobby but writing novels is my real job. I’m under a tight deadline to deliver my fifth novel by February. To do that, I’ve got to hunker down, cancel my cable subscription, stop consuming other people’s stories, and put everything I’ve got into my own creation.

This hiatus feels strange. I’ve been evaluating SVU for the past four years, and this is the first break.  I’m not used to getting a good night’s sleep on Wednesdays!  I’m going to miss, most of all, your comments – I truly love the smart, funny observations that you guys make. But I’ll be back next spring, reality-checking TV and maybe even doing some bigger and better things with the blog. So stay tuned.

Meanwhile, thanks for your support.  Happy viewing!

SVU Episode #16-4: Holden’s Manifesto

Tonight’s SVU ripped its story from the headlines of Elliott Rodger, the “virgin killer” who published a deranged manifesto about his misogynist rage and non-existent sex life before going on a killing spree.

Recap:

A creepy young man named Holden Chase uses his phone to film himself lurking around New York while monologuing about how much he hates women who have rejected him, men who are more sexually successful than him, and his own virginity. [Read more…]

SVU Episode #16-3: Producer’s Backend

Tonight’s SVU shone a light on the darkest corner of Hollywood’s casting couch, where kids vying for roles are sexually abused and passed around by moguls and producers.

Recap:

In the wake of a hit-and-run, Nick arrests Tensley Evans, a beautiful but troubled starlet resembling Lindsey Lohan or Amanda Bynes. When she falsely accuses Nick of propositioning her, SVU gets involved. Dashcam video exonerates poor Nick, but car trouble is just the tip of Tensley’s iceberg. [Read more…]

SVU Episode #16-2: American Disgrace

Mashing up Ray Rice, Donald Sterling, Solange Knowles, and Darren Sharper, tonight’s SVU paid homage to TMZ’s greatest hits of 2014.

Recap:

A star NBA player named Shakir is attacked in an elevator by a beautiful woman who claims he raped her three months earlier. The attack is caught on the elevator video, and the resulting scandal leads two more women to come forward and claim that Shakir drugged and raped them. [Read more…]

SVU’s Season 16 Premiere!

SVU came back with a bang! Tonight’s episode was a fast, twisty roller coaster of a story that wove the harrowing real-life issue of sex slavery with a touching glimpse of Olivia’s newfound motherhood. The result was a flat-out terrific premiere that showed, once again, why fans can’t get enough of SVU.

Recap:

Olivia has just settled into motherhood with her adopted baby, Noah, when the arrest of a fourteen-year-old prostitute throws her world into chaos. The girl works for a terrifying sex trafficking ring involved in the death of Noah’s prostitute mother. But Olivia and her team dig deeper: finding more underage girls, a gaggle of muscle-bound pimps, and a shady Uber-like cab company transporting the girls around town to service middle-aged married men.

Nick goes undercover to try to gain a pimp’s trust – but soon witnesses are getting killed left and right. (Olivia’s going to need more than her baby wipes to clean up all that blood.) The gang even takes a shot at Noah! Mama Bear Benson is now on the war path.

Our newest detective, Sonny Carisi, makes it 39 minutes into the franchise before he’s enlisted to go undercover in a prostitution sting. [Read more…]

Oscar Pistorius Verdict

In light of today’s verdict, where the “Blade Runner” was acquitted of murdering his girfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, many people have asked me what I think of the trial. Here, in bullet-points, are a few quick initial thoughts.

*Pistorius was found not guilty of murder, but is still on the hook for negligence. The judge may find Pistorius guilty of a lesser charge, “culpable homicide,” aka manslaughter.  That charge can carry anything from a suspended sentence to a long jail term. The judge will announce her decision on the culpable homicide issue tomorrow.

* She will apply the test of what a “reasonable man” with Pistorius’s disabilities should have done. She tipped her hand, saying she was “not persuaded that a reasonable person with the accused’s disabilities would have fired four shots” into the bathroom. Pistorius could have called security or went to the balcony and yelled for help.

* South Africa itself has been on trial, especially the police and criminal justice system. The police bungling of this high profile case makes you question what kind of mistakes happen under the radar in everyday cases. The case showed the worst of the police: mishandling of evidence, even evidence of the police stealing Pistorius’s watches. [Read more…]

How could she marry him? Why Janay Rice and so many domestic-violence victims stand by their man.

Of all the figures in the Ray Rice scandal, his wife Janay is the most mysterious.  Ray himself?  An irredeemable villain.  NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, who initially gave Ray a paltry two-game suspension?  A coldhearted businessman protecting his bottom line.  But what about Janay Rice, the woman who said “I do” to the running back a few weeks after he beat her into unconsciousness?  Inexplicable.

In fact, 80% of domestic violence victims are back together with their abusers by the time of trial, and don’t want charges brought.  As a DV prosecutor, I saw this over and over.  I’d meet a woman the day of her attack. She’d be bloody and bruised and ready to send her assailant to jail. Two months later, on the day of trial, she’d be cuddling her abuser in the back of the courtroom. “Please, Ms. Leotta,” she’d say. “I don’t want him to go to jail. I love him. Drop the charges.”

If Janay Rice had been mugged by a stranger, she’d wanted him arrested.  But being beaten by a man you love is a very different thing. [Read more…]

Lessons from a Sex-Crimes Prosecutor — by Heide Herrmann

My friend, Heide Herrmann, is a sex-crimes prosecutor at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia (the same job I held before becoming an author).  She has handled some of the office’s most high-profile sex-crime cases, but is known for bringing incredible diligence, compassion, and good judgement to every case that crosses her desk. Heide is leaving the USAO to work for DOJ’s Consumer Protection Branch.  Her recent Facebook post about the lessons she learned from the job really resonated with me.  In a few lines, she captured a lot of what the job is about.  Her post is reprinted below. Good luck with the new job, Heide, and thanks for making the city a better place: one day  and one person, at a time. — Allison

As I embark upon my last week as an Assistant United States Attorney, below is a list, in no particular order, of a few of the lessons I’ve learned over the last six years or so. Some more trite than others.

1.  You gotta fake it ’til you make it.

2.  Everything about being a prosecutor is scary as hell. And it’s how I now know how brave I am capable of being.

3.  When a person tells you that you can’t possibly understand how she feels, she’s right. But you should still try.

4.  I can’t fix all of the problems for all of the people I meet. But every day, there is at least one thing I can do to make one person’s life a little easier, safer or better.

5.  No means no. Unconscious means no. So drunk that she can’t walk or talk means no. If that seems obvious to you, good. Teach it to your sons anyway, because apparently it’s not obvious to everyone.

6.  If a car runs you down in the middle of a crosswalk, it’s the driver’s fault, not yours. But you still look both ways before crossing. Young women — please think about how much you drink, and whether you’ll still be safe if you have another, and another, and another. If a man assaults you it’s his fault, not yours, but I’d rather you never find yourself in that situation.

7.  Hug your children. Tell them how important they are. Talk to them, listen to them, love them, protect and appreciate them. If you already do that, good. Do it more. You’d be surprised how many children have no one who gives them the most basic care and kindness. I don’t want to tell you more, because then it’ll hurt you, the way it hurts me.

8.  There is no group of people more concerned about doing justice, protecting the vulnerable, and maintaining the highest level of ethical and professional standards than the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia. I will always be proud to have practiced alongside these heroic prosecutors, and to have served the citizens of the District of Columbia.